London Review of Education (LRE) is an open-access peer-reviewed journal featuring rigorous, theoretically based research into contemporary education.

Based at the UCL Institute of Education in London, the journal reflects the Institute’s broad interests in all types of education in all contexts – local, national, global – and its commitment to analysis across disciplines using a variety of methodologies. It is free to write for and free to read.

Volume 15, Number 2, July 2017

General articles

Special feature

NEGOTIATING THE NATION: Young people, national narratives and history education

Edited by Jocelyn Létourneau & Arthur Chapman, with a foreword by James Wertsch

In the past decade, scholars around the world have posed questions about young people’s knowledge and understanding of the past which interrogate the persistent view that young people are ignorant of their country’s past. Research on these issues has aimed to understand how young people do think about, know and understand history, and how they do structure and organize this knowledge and understanding. The ‘Negotiating the nation’ feature focuses on the multiple sources of young people’s historical knowledge, on young people as active builders of historical sense rather than as passive assimilators of materials presented to them, and on the relationships between young people, schools, identity and national, intranational, international and supranational contexts around the world. The work of James Wertsch has been influential in providing conceptual tools for researchers in this field and we are delighted that he has written a foreword to this feature. It comprises a critical literature review and eight international research articles:

BELGIUM: Flemish students’ historical reference knowledge and narratives of the Belgian national past at the end of secondary education, Timo VAN HAVERE, Kaat WILS, Fien DEPAEPE, Lieven VERSCHAFFEL & Karel VAN NIEUWENHUYSE

CANADA: History as a ‘GPS’: On the uses of historical narrative for French Canadian students’ life orientation and identity, Stéphane LÉVESQUE

ISRAEL: The useful past in negotiation: Adolescents’ use of history in negotiation of inter-group conflict, Tsafrir GOLDBERG

THE NETHERLANDS: Why national narratives are perpetuated: New insights from history textbook research (critical literature review), Maria GREVER & Tina VAN DER VLIES

NEW ZEALAND: ‘We need to remember they died for us’: How young people in New Zealand make meaning of war remembrance and commemoration of the First World War, Mark SHEEHAN & Martyn DAVISON

SOUTH AFRICA: In search of historical consciousness: An investigation into young South Africans’ knowledge and understanding of ‘their’ national histories, Kate ANGIER

SWEDEN: The Swedes and their history, Hans OLOFSSON, Johan SAMUELSSON, Martin STOLARE and Joakim WENDELL

UGANDA: ‘I was born in the reign…’: Historical orientation in Ugandan students’ national narratives, Ulrik HOLMBERG

USA: Making narrative connections? Exploring how late teens relate their own lives to the historically significant past, Elizabeth DAWES DURAISINGH

Book reviews

Aims and scope

Founded in 2003 by the UCL Institute of Education, the journal reflects the Institute’s broad interests in all types of education in all contexts − local, national, global − and its commitment to analysis across disciplines using a variety of methodologies. It shares the Institute’s aspiration to interrogate links between research, policy and practice, and its principled concern for social justice.

Drawing on these strengths, LRE is an eclectic and engaging journal that features analysis across key themes in education, including: public goals and policies; pedagogy; curriculum; organization; resources and technology; and institutional effectiveness. Its articles and book reviews are written by experts in education, psychology, sociology, policy studies, philosophy and other disciplines contributing to education research, and by experienced researcher-practitioners working in the field.

LRE welcomes submission of relevant articles and book reviews. Articles should be sent to LRE’s editor, Professor Hugh Starkey and book reviews to Dr Pete Wright. For more details about what types of material to submit, and how to submit them, visit the ‘Call for papers’ and ‘Notes for authors’ tabs on this web page.

ISSN 1474-8479 (online)  

 

Editor

Hugh Starkey, UCL Institute of Education

Editorial team

Pete Wright (book reviews editor); Pat Gordon-Smith (managing editor); Vincent Carpentier,  Arthur Chapman, Rob Higham, Gwyneth Hughes, William Locke, Tamjid Mujtaba, Richard Race,  Lynne Rogers, Paul Temple, Jan Tripney (associate editors); Nozomi Sakata, Charlotte Vidal-Hall (student members).

External advisory board

James Banks, University of Washington, USA; Margaret Carr, University of Waikato, New Zealand; Allan Luke, Queensland University of Technology, Australia; Geetha Nambissan, Jawaharlal University, New Delhi, India; Miguel Pereyra, University of Granada, Spain; Eileen Scanlon, Open University, UK; Juergen Schriewer, Humboldt University, Germany; Harvey Siegel, University of Miami, USA; Jasmine Boon Yee Sim, National Institute of Education, Singapore; John Smyth, University of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia; Ken Zeichner, University of Washington, Seattle, USA; Zhou Zuoyu, Beijing Normal University, China

UCL Institute of Education Executive Board

Becky Francis (Chair), Hugh Starkey (Editor), Clare Brooks, Gary McCulloch, Stephen Ball, Julie Dockrell, Alison Fuller

Call for papers

LRE invites you to submit papers on research and analysis related to education in any context. We publish general articles in every issue regardless of whether there is a special feature planned, so please do feel free to submit a paper at any time.

We especially welcome articles of around 6,000 words that reveal links between research, policy, and practice, and which analyse key themes in education, including public goals and policies, pedagogy, curriculum, organization, resources and technology, and institutional effectiveness. We also consider some other types of content. This might be a research ‘conversation’ between two or more academics, succinct analysis (2,000-3,000 words) of a current issue in education, or a report about ongoing research. Please submit articles to LRE’s editor, Professor Hugh Starkey.

Every issue of LRE features reviews of books on education. Please send your reviews to the book reviews editor, Dr Pete Wright.

Special calls for papers

KNOWLEDGE AND SUBJECT-SPECIALIST TEACHING
A special feature edited by DAVID LAMBERT, for publication in Autumn 2018

Deadlines

  • receipt of abstracts 31 October 2017
  • draft articles 15 February 2018

For full information, see the detailed call for papers.

EDUCATION AND MOBILITIES: Ideas, people and technologies
Edited by HUGH STARKEY, for publication in July 2018

Deadlines

  • expression of interest/abstracts 14 July 2017
  • draft articles 13 October 2017

For full information, see the detailed call for papers.

Notes for authors

The London Review of Education is an Open Access journal in which new contributions are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence. This means that authors retain copyright in their own work, but make it available for others to share (copy or redistribute in any medium or format) or adapt for any purpose (even commercially), provided that the author/s of the original work is/are acknowledged. Authors also warrant that any work by third parties that they reproduce within their own work may be shared or adapted in the same way.

The London Review of Education considers all manuscripts on condition that they have not been published already and are not under consideration for publication or in press elsewhere.

Contributions to London Review of Education must report original research and will be subjected to review by referees at the discretion of the Editorial Office.

Manuscripts to be considered for publication should be sent to the journal’s editor, Professor Hugh Starkey.

Books for review should be sent to: Dr Pete Wright, UCL Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL. For the correct format, please read our guidance for book review authors before submitting a review.

Authors are encouraged to submit manuscripts electronically. Electronic submissions should be sent as email attachments using a standard word processing program. If email submission is not possible, please send an electronic version on disk.

1. General guidelines

Manuscripts should not be more than 6,000 words in length and must be written in good, standard English, using British spelling (use the Oxford Concise Dictionary as an arbiter of preferred spellings). They should also be double-spaced throughout with ample margins, and bear the title of the contribution and name/s of the authors.

The full postal and email address of the author who will check proofs and receive correspondence should be included as well. All pages should be numbered.

An abstract of no more than 100 words in length, a list of up to six keywords and a very brief (c. 60 words) bio-note about the author/s should also be included. Footnotes to the text are strongly discouraged.

2. Style Guidelines

For general style points and for references, please follow the UCL IOE Press Editorial style sheet.

Write clearly and concisely, using arguments that are fully substantiated with well-reasoned analysis and, where appropriate, empirical evidence. All acronyms for national agencies, examinations, etc., should be spelled out the first time they are mentioned. Contributors are asked to take account of the international readership of the London Review of Education by explaining in full the use of terms that might be meaningful only to a particular local or national audience. Authors are also urged to bear in mind that education policy makers and non-education academics will also read the London Review of Education, which means that contributions should be accessible and comprehensible to a wide range of professionals. For all manuscripts, non-discriminatory language is mandatory.

Citations of other work should be limited to those strictly necessary for the argument. Any quotations should be brief, and always accompanied by precise references.

If you have any questions about references or formatting your article, please contact the journal’s Managing Editor, Pat Gordon-Smith.

3. Tables, illustrations, and figures; copyright

LRE welcomes the inclusion of graphs, artwork, photographs, videos and sound files in support of submitted articles. They must be good quality and with full permission to publish in an open access publication.

Authors are responsible for determining the copyright status of illustrations or other material they wish to reproduce in their article and, if necessary, obtaining permission to reproduce it. This applies both to direct reproduction and to ‘derivative reproduction’ (where authors create a new figure or table which derives substantially from a copyrighted source). As noted above, by including such material in their submission, authors warrant that it may be reproduced or adapted under the terms of the CC-BY licence in the same way as their own work, so they must make this requirement clear to those whose permission they are seeking. Please note that short extracts of copyright text (excluding poetry and song lyrics) for the purposes of criticism, discussion, or review may be reproduced without formal permission assuming that the quotation is reproduced accurately and full attribution is given.

Illustrations and figures should be submitted in separate documents and not included in the text of the article, though tables should be included in the text. Figures will not usually be redrawn by the publisher, so they should be submitted in a form that is suitable for publication (not less than 300 dpi resolution). The place at which a table, figure, or illustration is to be inserted in the text should be indicated clearly on the manuscript. Captions should include keys to symbols.

4. Open access and self-archiving

  1. London Review of Education is an open-access journal in which new contributions are made available under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence. This means that authors retain copyright in their own work, but make it available for others to distribute, remix, tweak and build upon their work, even commercially, as long as credit is given for the original creation. Authors also warrant that any work by third parties reproduced within their own work may be shared or adapted in the same way.
  2. UCL IOE Press makes no charges of any kind for submission to, publication in, or access to London Review of Education. Once published, your article will be online on the ingentaconnect journals platform, where it will be available for anyone to read or download without charge.
  3. Authors may self-archive both preprint and accepted versions of their article at any time provided that, on publication, it is replaced by the final published version.
The London Review of Education launched in 2003. It has published three issues every year since then and has a significant backlist of expert research and analysis about education in many contexts. Here, we present a number of reading lists compiled by the journal’s associate editors highlighting current, recent and historical London Review of Education articles that are relevant to specific areas of interest and investigation.

Citizenship and moral education

The London Review of Education’s editor Hugh Starkey, Professor of Citizenship and Human Rights Education at the UCL Institute of Education, has identified the following articles as being highly relevant to scholars and students researching citizenship and moral education.

 

This list of London Review of Education articles is by no means exhaustive, but these papers provide a strong indication of the journal’s commitment to social justice in general and citizenship and moral education in particular. All articles published in LRE are thoroughly peer reviewed and open access. The full list of contents of the journal’s more than 14 years of publishing is free for browsing and searching.

 

Alderson, P. (2016) ‘International human rights, citizenship education, and critical realism’. London Review of Education, 14 (3), 1-12.

Apple, M.W. (2003) ‘Strategic alliance or hegemonic strategy? Conservatism among the dispossessed’. London Review of Education, 1 (1), 47-60.

Apple, M.W. (2013) ‘Between traditions: Stephen Ball and the critical sociology of education’. London Review of Education, 11 (3), 206-17.

Bryan, A. (2008) ‘The co-articulation of national identity and interculturalism in the Irish curriculum: Educating for democratic citizenship?’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 47-58.

Camicia, S.P. and Franklin, B.M. (2010) ‘Curriculum reform in a globalised world: The discourses of cosmopolitanism and community’. London Review of Education, 8 (2), 93-104.

Chapman, C (2004) ‘Leadership for improvement in urban and challenging contexts’. London Review of Education, 2 (2), 95-108

Côté, J.E. (2005) ‘Identity capital, social capital and the wider benefits of learning: Generating resources facilitative of social cohesion’. London Review of Education, 3 (3), 221-37.

Crick, B. (2008) ‘Citizenship, diversity and national identity’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 31-7.

Davies, L. (2004) ‘Building a civic culture post-conflict’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 229-44.

Elwood, J. (2013) ‘The role(s) of student voice in 14–19 education policy reform: Reflections on consultation and participation’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 97-111.

Ferguson, D.L., Hanreddy, A. and Draxton, S. (2011) ‘Giving students voice as a strategy for improving teacher practice’. London Review of Education, 9 (1), 55-70.

Fielding, M (2004) ‘“New wave” student voice and the renewal of civic society’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 197-217.

Foster, S.J. and Davis, O.L. Jr (2004) ‘Conservative battles for public education within America’s culture wars: Poignant lessons for today from the red scare of the 1950s’. London Review of Education, 2 (2), 123-35.

Garratt, D. (2011) ‘Equality, difference and the absent presence of “race” in citizenship education in the UK’. London Review of Education, 9 (1), 27-39.

Ginieniewicz, J. (2008) ‘Citizenship learning and political participation: The case of Latin American-Canadians’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 71-85.

Haas, C. (2008) ‘Citizenship education in Denmark: Reinventing the nation and/or conducting multiculturalism(s)?’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 59-69.

Hayward, G. and Williams, R. (2011) ‘Joining the big society: Am I bothered?’. London Review of Education, 9 (2), 175-89.

Hayward, L. (2013) ‘From why to why not? The conundrum of including learners’ perspectives: A response to this special issue’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 184-9.

Hopfenbeck, T.N. (2013) ‘Students’ voice, aspirations, and perspectives: International reflections and comparisons’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 179-83.

Ibarrola-García, S. and Iriarte, C. (2014) ‘Socio-emotional empowering through mediation to resolve conflicts in a civic way’.  London Review of Education, 12 (3), 261-73.

Ke, L. and Starkey, H. (2014) ‘Active citizens, good citizens, and insouciant bystanders: The educational implications of Chinese university students’ civic participation via social networking’. London Review of Education, 12 (1), 50-62.

Kiwan, D. (2008) ‘Diversity and identity in societal context: Introductory remarks’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 27-30.

Leoncini, S. (2014) ‘Equality and inclusion of the Palestinian minority in mixed Israeli schools: A case study of Jaffa’s Weizman School’. London Review of Education, 12 (3), 274-85.

Luna, E. and Folgueiras, P. (2014) ‘Learning methodology in the classroom to encourage participation’. London Review of Education, 12 (1), 63-76.

Murray, H. (2008) ‘Curriculum wars: National identity in education’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 39-45.

Nixon, J. (2004) ‘Education for the good society: The integrity of academic practice’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 245-52.

O’Boyle, A. (2013) ‘Valuing the talk of young people: Are we nearly there yet?’, London Review of Education, 11 (2), 127-39.

Osler, A (2008) ‘Citizenship education and the Ajegbo report: Re-imagining a cosmopolitan nation’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 11-25.

Preston, J., Feinstein, L. and Anderson, T.M. (2005) ‘Can adult education change extremist attitudes?’. London Review of Education, 3 (3), 289-309.

Ranson, S, (2004) ‘Configuring school and community for learning: The role of governance’. London Review of Education, 2 (1), 3-15.

Richardson, R. (2015) ‘British values and British identity: Muddles, mixtures, and ways ahead’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 37-48.

Riddell, S. and Tett, L. (2004) ‘New community schools and inter-agency working: Assessing the effectiveness of social justice initiatives’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 219-28.

Scanlon, M. and Buckingham, D. (2003) ‘Debating the digital curriculum: Intersections of the public and the private in educational and cultural policy’. London Review of Education, 1 (3), 191-205.

Seddon, T (2004) ‘Remaking civic formation: Towards a learning citizen?’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 171-86.

Sheeran, Y., Brown, B.J. and Baker, S. (2007) ‘Conflicting philosophies of inclusion: The contestation of knowledge in widening participation’. London Review of Education, 5 (3), 249-63.

Short, G. (2003) ‘Holocaust education in the primary school: Some reflections on an emergent debate’. London Review of Education, 1 (2), 119-29.

Shukra, K., Back, L., Keith, M., Khan, A. and Solomos, J. (2004) ‘Race, social cohesion and the changing politics of citizenship’. (2004) London Review of Education, 2 (3), 187-95.

Starkey, H. (2008) ‘Diversity and citizenship in the curriculum’. London Review of Education, 6 (1), 5-10.

Tetler, S. and Baltzer, K. (2011) ‘The climate of inclusive classrooms: The pupil perspective’. London Review of Education, 9 (3), 333-44.

Ubachs, F. (2016)By addressing life trajectories and political violence, human rights education can overcome radicalizing narratives’. London Review of Education, 14 (3), 85-95.

Unterhalter, E. (2009) ‘Global justice or other people’s problems? Computer gaming and critical reflection in an international classroom’. London Review of Education, 7 (1), 41-53.

Vorhaus, J.  (2014) ‘Prisoners’ right to education: A philosophical survey’. London Review of Education, 12 (2), 162-74.

Watkins, C. (2005) ‘Classrooms as learning communities: A review of research’. London Review of Education, 3 (1), 47-64.

Wiborg, S. (2004) ‘Education and social integration: A comparative study of the comprehensive school system in Scandinavia’. London Review of Education, 2 (2), 83-93.

Wright, P. (2016) ‘Social justice in the mathematics classroom’. London Review of Education, 14 (2), 104-18.

Comparative and international education

This list of titles was chosen by Nozomi Sakata, a PhD student at the UCL Institute of Education and student member of the editorial team for the London Review of Education. Her PhD research looks at the implementation of learner-centred pedagogy in Tanzanian primary schools.

 

The papers here are just some of those published in the journal about comparative and international education. The full list of contents of the journal’s 15 volumes is free for browsing and searching.

 

Caruana, V. (2016) ‘Researching the transnational higher education policy landscape: Exploring network power and dissensus in a globalizing system’. LRE 14 (1), 56-69.

Chen, S.-Y. (2012) ‘Contributing knowledge and knowledge workers: The role of Chinese universities in the knowledge economy’. LRE 10 (1), 101-12.

Frostad, P., Mjaavatn, P.E. & Pijl, S.J. (2011) ‘The stability of social relations among adolescents with special educational needs (SEN) in regular schools in Norway’. LRE 9 (1), 83-94.

Garratt, D. (2011) ‘Equality, difference and the absent presence of “race” in citizenship education in the UK’. LRE 9 (1), 27-39.

Giota, J. & Emanuelsson, I. (2011) ‘Policies in special education support issues in Swedish compulsory school: a nationally representative study of head teachers’ judgements’. LRE 9 (1), 95-108.

Green, A. (2003) ‘Education, globalization and the role of comparative research’. LRE 1 (2), 83-97.

Huang, X.-H., Adamson, B. & Lee, J.C.-K. (2014) ‘The move to quality assurance in Chinese higher education: Tensions between policy and practices’. LRE 12 (3), 286-99.

Katsuno, M. & Takei, T. (2008) ‘School evaluation at Japanese schools: Policy intentions and practical appropriation’. LRE 6 (2), 171-81.

Mainardes, J. & Gandin, L.A. (2013) ‘Contributions of Stephen J. Ball to the research on educational and curriculum policies in Brazil’. LRE 11 (3), 256-64.

Michel, S. (2015) ‘Education in Thailand: When economic growth is no longer enough’. LRE 13 (3), 79-91.

Tang, S. & Adamson, T. (2014) ‘Student-centredness in urban schools in China’. LRE 12 (1), 90-103.

Leoncini, S. (2014) ‘Equality and inclusion of the Palestinian minority in mixed Israeli schools: A case study of Jaffa’s Weizman School’. LRE 12 (3), 274-85.

Ngware, M.W., Ciera, J., Abuya, B.A., Oketch, M. & Mutisya, M. (2012) ‘What explains gender gaps in maths achievement in primary schools in Kenya?’ LRE 10 (1), 55-73.

Ngware, M.W., Mutisya, M. & Oketch, M. (2012) ‘Patterns of teaching style and active teaching: do they differ across subjects in low and high performing primary schools in Kenya?’ LRE 10 (1), 35-54.

Oketch, M., Mutisya, M. and Sagwe, J. (2012) ‘Do poverty dynamics explain the shift to an informal private schooling system in the wake of free public primary education in Nairobi slums?’ LRE 10 (1), 3-17.

Oketch, M., Mutisya, M., Sagwe, J., Musyoka, P. & Ngware, M.W. (2012) ‘The effect of active teaching and subject content coverage on students’ achievement: Evidence from primary schools in Kenya’. LRE 10 (1), 19-33.

Van Zanten, A. & Kosunen, S. (2013) ‘School choice research in five European countries: The circulation of Stephen Ball’s concepts and interpretations’. LRE 11 (3), 239-55.

Warwick, I. & Aggleton, P. (2004) ‘Building on experience: A formative evaluation of a peer education sexual health project in South Africa’. LRE 2 (2), 137-53

Weymans, W. (2010) ‘Democracy, knowledge and critique: Rethinking European universities beyond tradition and the market’. LRE 8 (2), 117-26.

Education policy and social justice

Chosen by London Review of Education associate editor, Dr Richard Race, Senior Lecturer in Education at Roehampton University, author of Multiculturalism and Education, 2nd edition (Bloomsbury, 2015) and co-editor of Advancing Race and Ethnicity in Education (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

 

This list of London Review of Education articles is by no means exhaustive, but these papers are notable and provide a strong indication of the journal’s commitment to social justice. More can be found by surveying the journal’s more than 14 years of publishing. The challenge for researchers is not only to read and apply the work below but to look beyond the initial search, as the empirical articles look conceptually and analytically beyond London and nationally into broad, international contexts.

 

Ball, S.J. (2003) ‘The risks of social reproduction: The middle class and education markets’. London Review of Education, 1 (3), 163-75.

Exley, S. (2009) ‘Emerging discourses within the English “choice advice” policy network’. London Review of Education, 7 (3), 249-60.

Grace, G. (2006) ‘Urban education: confronting the contradictions: An analysis with special reference to London’. London Review of Education, 4 (2), 115-31.

Hodgson, A. and Spours, K. (2011) ‘Educating 14- to 19-year olds in England: A UK lens on possible futures’. London Review of Education, 9 (2), 259-70.

Kehrwald, B. (2010) ‘Being online: Social presence as subjectivity in online learning’. London Review of Education, 8 (1), 39-50.

Lingard, B. and Sellar, S. (2013) ‘Globalization, edu-business and network governance: The policy sociology of Stephen J. Ball and rethinking education policy analysis’. London Review of Education, 11 (3), 265-80.

MacLaren, I. (2012) ‘The contradictions of policy and practice: Creativity in higher education’. London Review of Education, 10 (2), 159-72.

Pearce, D. and Gordon, L. (2005) ‘In the zone: New Zealand’s legislation for a system of school choice and its effects’. London Review of Education, 3 (2), 145-57.

Richardson, R. (2015) ‘British values and British identity: Muddles, mixtures, and ways ahead’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 37-48.

Tang, S. and Adamson, B. (2014) ‘Student-centredness in urban schools in China’. London Review of Education, 12 (1), 90-103.

Toyoshima, M. (2007) ‘International strategies of universities in England’. London Review of Education, 5 (3), 265-80.

Ubachs, F. (2016) ‘By addressing life trajectories and political violence, human rights education can overcome radicalizing narratives’. London Review of Education, 14 (3), 85-95.

Walker, M. (2008) ‘Widening participation; widening capability’. London Review of Education, 6 (3), 267-79.

Wiborg, S. (2004) ‘Education and social integration: A comparative study of the comprehensive school system in Scandinavia’. London Review of Education, 2 (2), 83-93.

Policymaking, governance and reform in education

Janice Tripney, Lecturer in Social Policy at the UCL Institute of Education and associate editor of the London Review of Education has identified the following articles in the journal as being highly relevant to scholars and students researching the area policymaking, governance and reform in education.

 

Adnett, N. and Tlupova, D. (2008) ‘Informed choice? The new English student funding system and widening participation. London Review of Education, 6 (3), 243-54.

Apple, M.W. (2003) ‘Strategic alliance or hegemonic strategy? Conservatism among the dispossessed. London Review of Education, 1 (1), 47-60.

Bates, A. (2012) ‘Transformation, trust and the “importance of teaching”: Continuities and discontinuities in the Coalition government’s discourse of education reform’. London Review of Education, 10 (1), 89-100.

Brighouse, H. (2003) ‘Against privatizing schools in the United Kingdom. London Review of Education, 1 (1), 35-45.

Brundrett, M. (2015) ‘Policy on the primary curriculum since 2010: The demise of the expert view’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 49-49.

Bynner, J. and Feinstein, L. (2005) What can policy learn from the research on the wider benefits of learning? (editorial). London Review of Education, 3 (3), 177-90.

Cagliesi, G. and Hawkes, D. (2015) ‘Mind the gap between the policy announcements and implementation: The Youth Contract and Jobcentre Plus advisers’ role as careers educators for 18–24-year olds’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 60-9.

Caporal-Ebersold, E. and Young, A. (2016) ‘Negotiating and appropriating the ‘one person, one language’ policy within the complex reality of a multilingual crèche in Strasbourg. London Review of Education, 14 (2), 122-33.

Carasso, H. and Gunn, A. (2015) ‘Fees, fairness and the National Scholarship Programme: Higher education policy in England and the Coalition Government‘. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 70-83.

Carpentier, V. (2013) ‘Inquiring into educational policies: A special issue on the contribution of Stephen Ball (editorial). London Review of Education, 11 (3), 203-05.

Caruana,  V. (2016) ‘Researching the transnational higher education policy landscape: Exploring network power and dissensus in a globalizing system’. London Review of Education, 14 (1), 56-69.

Clark, P. (2012) ‘Are national higher education policies adequate for the next decade?. London Review of Education, 10 (3), 247-60.

Costelloe, A. and Warner, K. (2014) ‘Prison education across Europe: Policy, practice, politics. London Review of Education, 12 (2), 175-83.

Demie, F. (2003) ‘Raising the achievement of Caribbean pupils in British schools: Unacknowledged problems and challenges for policy makers. London Review of Education, 1 (3), 229-49.

Dodds, A. (2011) ‘The British higher education funding debate: The perils of “talking economics”’. London Review of Education, 9 (3), 317-31.

Doyle, M. and Griffin, M. (2012) ‘Raised aspirations and attainment? A review of the impact of Aimhigher (2004–2011) on widening participation in higher education in England. London Review of Education, 10 (1), 75-88.

Elwood, J. (2013) ‘The role(s) of student voice in 14–19 education policy reform: Reflections on consultation and participation’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 97-111.

Elwood, J. and Baird, J.-A. (2013) ‘Students: Researching voice, aspirations and perspectives in the context of educational policy change in the 14–19 phase (editorial)’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 91-6.

Ellyson,  C., Andrew, C. and Clément, R. (2016) ‘Language planning and education of adult immigrants in Canada: Contrasting the provinces of Quebec and British Columbia, and the cities of Montreal and Vancouver’. London Review of Education, 14 (2), 134-56.

Exley, S. (2009) ‘Emerging discourses within the English “choice advice” policy network’. London Review of Education, 7 (3), 249-60.

Filippakou, O. (2016) ‘Higher education policymaking in an era of increasing marketization’. London Review of Education, 14 (1), 1-3.

Filipakkou, O. and Tapper, T. (2016) ‘Policymaking and the politics of change in higher education: The new 1960s universities in the UK, then and now’. London Review of Education, 14 (1), 11-22.

Foster, S.J. and Davis, Jr, O.L. (2004) ‘Conservative battles for public education within America’s culture wars: Poignant lessons for today from the red scare of the 1950s’. London Review of Education, 2 (2), 123-35.

Franklin, B.M. (2005) ‘Gone before you know it: Urban school reform and the short life of the Education Action Zone initiative’. London Review of Education, 3 (1), 3-27.

Giota, J. and Emanuelsson, I. (2010) ‘Policies in special education support issues in Swedish compulsory school: A nationally representative study of head teachers’ judgements’. London Review of Education, 9 (1), 95-108.

Glatter, R. (2017) ‘“Because we can”: Pluralism and structural reform in education’. London Review of Education, 15 (1), 115-25.

Green, A. (2003) ‘Education, globalisation and the role of comparative research. London Review of Education, 1 (2), 83-97.

Higham, J. and Yeomans, D. (2007) ‘Curriculum choice, flexibility and differentiation 14–19: The way forward or flawed prospectus?’. London Review of Education, 5 (3), 281-97.

Higham, J. and Yeomans, D. (2011) ‘Thirty years of 14–19 education and training in England: Reflections on policy, curriculum and organisation. London Review of Education, 9 (2), 217-30.

Hodgson, A. and Spours, K. (2010) ‘Policy for the education and training of 14- to 19-year-olds in the UK – New uncertainties and new divisions?.’ (Editorial) London Review of Education, 9 (2), 145-51.

Huang, X.-H., Adamson, B. and Lee, J.C.-K. (2014) ‘The move to quality assurance in Chinese higher education: Tensions between policy and practices’. London Review of Education, 12 (3), 286-99.

Isaacs, T. (2013) ‘Students’ views and qualification policy development: Perspectives on failed vocationally related policies’. London Review of Education, 11 (2), 174-8.

Kan, V. and Adamson, B. (2010) ‘Language policies for Hong Kong schools since 1997’. London Review of Education, 8 (2), 167-76.

Katsuno, M. and Takei, T. (2008) ‘School evaluation at Japanese schools: Policy intentions and practical appropriation’. London Review of Education, 6 (2), 171-81.

Kennedy, K.J., Chan, J.K.-S. and Fok, P.K. (2011) ‘Holding policy-makers to account: exploring “soft” and “hard” policy and the implications for curriculum reform’. London Review of Education, 9 (1), 41-54.

Lingard, B. and Sellar, S. (2013) ‘Globalization, edu-business and network governance: The policy sociology of Stephen J. Ball and rethinking education policy analysis’. London Review of Education, 11 (3), 265-80.

Lloyd, E. (2015) ‘Early childhood education and care policy in England under the Coalition Government’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 144-56.

Loomis, S.R., Rodriguez, J.P., Honeycutt, J. and Arellano, M. (2006) ‘Public–private convergence and the special case of voucher-receiving schools’. London Review of Education, 4 (3), 239-51.

MacLaren, I. (2012) ‘The contradictions of policy and practice: Creativity in higher education’. London Review of Education, 10 (2), 59-72.

Matthews, P. and Sammons, P. (2005) ‘Survival of the weakest: The differential improvement of schools causing concern in England’. London Review of Education, 3 (2), 159-76.

Mainardes, J. and Gandin, L.A. (2013) ‘Contributions of Stephen J. Ball to the research on educational and curriculum policies in Brazil’. London Review of Education, 11 (3), 256-64.

Oakley, A. (2003) ‘Research evidence, knowledge management and educational practice: Early lessons from a systematic approach’. London Review of Education, 1 (1), 21-33.

Parekh, G., Flessa, J. and Smaller, H. (2016) ‘The Toronto District School Board: A global city school system’s structures, processes, and student outcomes’. London Review of Education, 14 (3), 65-84.

Pearce, D. and Gordon, L. (2005) ‘In the zone: New Zealand’s legislation for a system of school choice and its effects’. London Review of Education, 3 (2), 145-57.

Power, S., Rees, G. and Taylor, C. (2005) ‘New Labour and educational disadvantage: The limits of area-based initiatives’. London Review of Education, 3 (2), 101-16.

Scanlon, M. and Buckingham, D. (2003) ‘Debating the digital curriculum: Intersections of the public and the private in educational and cultural policy’. London Review of Education, 1 (3), 191-205. 

Seddon, T. (2004) ‘Remaking civic formation: Towards a learning citizen?’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 171-86.

Shukra, K., Back, L., Keith, M., Khan, A. and Solomos, J. (2004) ‘Race, social cohesion and the changing politics of citizenship’. London Review of Education, 2 (3), 187-95.

Simon, C.A. (2013) ‘Extended schooling and community education: Mapping the policy terrain’. London Review of Education, 11 (1), 20-31.

Smith, A. and Smith, E. (2007) ‘The development of key training policies in England and Australia: A comparison’. London Review of Education, 5 (1), 51-67.

Strohl, N.M. (2006) The postmodern university revisited: Reframing higher education debates from the “two cultures” to postmodernity’. London Review of Education, 4 (3), 133-48.

Temple, P. (2003) ‘Educational research and policymaking: Findings from some transitional countries’. London Review of Education, 1 (3), 217-28.

Temple, P. (2015) ‘What has the Coalition Government done for higher education?’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 174-8.

Toyoshima, M. (2007) ‘International strategies of universities in England’. London Review of Education, 5 (3), 265-80.

West, A. (2015) ‘Education policy and governance in England under the Coalition Government (2010–15): Academies, the pupil premium, and free early education’. London Review of Education, 13 (2), 21-36.

Wilkinson, G. (2006) ‘Commercial breaks: An overview of corporate opportunities for commercializing education in US and English schools’. London Review of Education, 4 (3), 253-69.

Williams, G. (2011) ‘Some thoughts on higher education, Browne and Coalition policy’. London Review of Education, 9 (1), 1-4.

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